Inside the Facebook Papers


On October 5, a former member of Facebook’s civic misinformation group named Frances Haugen testified before Congress. In her almost two years at Facebook, Haugen mentioned, she had persistently seen the firm prioritize development over all else, to the detriment of its customers and society at giant. It had lengthy ignored the warnings of its personal researchers about the platform’s potential harms. And she had gathered hundreds of pages of inner paperwork—now collectively referred to as The Facebook Papers—to show it.

The paperwork have been disclosed to the Securities and Exchange Commission and have been supplied to Congress in redacted kind by Haugen’s authorized counsel. The redacted variations have been reviewed by a consortium of stories organizations, together with WIRED.

The Wall Street Journal has already printed a series of stories based mostly on a few of these inner reviews. But the paperwork of their totality are most notable for the window they supply into Facebook’s repeated failings: how employees identified potential solutions to deep-seated problems and went unheard; how a few of those self same researchers left the company deeply disillusioned; how the downsides of development in any respect prices have been felt most acutely in developing nations.

The following tales seize these themes, drawing from the posts and reviews of Facebook staff themselves. Given the sheer quantity of paperwork—and the ripples already felt at Facebook and past—they’re possible removed from the final phrase. As WIRED and others proceed to sift via the tranche, anticipate extra revelations to come back, together with no matter reverberations could observe.

Internal analysis paperwork present a blueprint for fixing the firm’s largest issues.

The “badge posts” of the firm’s former researchers supply the parting ideas of the disillusioned.

Human reviewers and AI filters wrestle to police the flood of content material—or perceive the nuances in several Arabic dialects.


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